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BIC2013 Presentations Resume

 

In the coming weeks we will introduce each of the subjects of the keynote speakers.

 

Paul Morrell

 

Title: 

The Role of Government in Promoting BIM – the UK Experience  

 

Main content:

BIM is increasingly recognised as having the potential to create a new paradigm for construction.  This calls for the industry and its major clients to develop strategies to encourage and keep pace with beneficial change.

Good strategies identify the problem to be solved (diagnosis), posit remedial action in response to that problem (prescription), and then put in place a detailed proposition for the implementation of remedial measures (treatment plan).  Strategies developed by the UK Government, working with industry, address all three.

 

 

Main topics: 

The problem: high cost, low productivity (and virtually zero improvement in productivity) and projects that frequently miss their targets (in respect of outcome, intrinsic quality, cost and/or programme), as a consequence of:-

  • the complexity of industry structures and relationships;
  • silo mentality and a lack of integration;
  • low initial capital cost being prioritised over whole life value;
  • confused communications and wasteful processes as a consequence of all of the above;

all at a time when we face unprecedented challenges.

Action in response to the above:

  • the importance of integration and the alignment of interests;
  • innovation and the potential in the supply chain;
  • the specific and broader contribution of BIM.

The role of Government, as both client and sponsor of the industry, in stimulating change: 

  • process mapping and organizing itself as an effective client;
  • the market failure implicit in an excess of choice;
  • standards, protocols and training.  

A look ahead to the longer term impact of BIM on the structure, conduct and performance of the construction industry.

 

Learning objectives:  

  • How BIM addresses structural problems in the industry
  • What government should (and shouldn’t) do 
  • The perils of inaction.

 


 

Kari Ristolainen

 

Title: 

Decade of BIM  - Benefits and Challenges  

 

Main content:

Use of the existing buildings and properties is the main challenge.  It’s important to collect up-to-date data of the buildings and their renovations and updates. BIM helps in question of ergonomics in communication concerning advices and requirements. Methods of energy savings and reducing emissions has to be easier to maintain and end-user friendly .

Senate Properties’ all property and service solutions are based on environmental and economical and social sustainability. One key factor for getting better buildings is to use efficient and reliable energy analysis in the concept design stage. In Finland we need new contract forms to divide benefits and risks equally between the parties.

Case: Initial data mapping with laser scanning of HVAC installations and bearing structures.  

 

Main topics: 

  • Challenges and possibilities in the built environment 
  • Better buildings and less energy usage 
  • The Common BIM Requirements 2012
  • Accurate BIM

 

Learning objectives:  

  • BIM and Quality hand in hand 
  • BIM and refurbishment 
  • New contract forms needed 

 


 

Heikki Kulusjarvi

 

Title: 

Meaning of “I” in BIM 

 

Main content:

 

Traditional document based design is based on interpretation of documents, meaning that each stakeholder extracts or measures the information they need from the documents the way they believe is right. This is not always how it was intended in the first place leading to misinterpretation and quality problems, extra costs and schedule delays.

The idea of BIM is that information is carried in the process as it is. Thus managing information is the key in BIM based processes. During first steps to BIM utilization information is used for example for Design Coordination, Quality Assurance, Quantity Take-off, Area Calculations etc. All these use cases have specific requirements for the information and the quality of it. This is why it is of paramount importance to define what information is actually required and how this information should be modelled in the BIM authoring tools. Open BIM standard (IFC) gives wide possibilities to exchange information between stakeholders in projects but that is only the framework.

To make modeling successful, project-specific priorities and objectives must be set for models and model utilization. Project-specific requirements will be defined and documented on the basis of the objectives and general requirements set in local BIM requirements.

  

 

Main topics: 

  • Steps taken by leading BIM countries in BIM Adoption
  • Why local BIM Requirements are important
  • Introducing selected local BIM Requirements
  • Insights of making BIM Requirements
  • Recommendations

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Information in BIM makes it work, but needs to be defined
  • Learn what others have done with BIM Requirements

 


 

 

Malcolm Taylor

 

Title: 

Delivery of a Major Infrastructure Project with BIM 

 

Main content:

 

 

Crossrail is the largest construction project in Europe (€18 Billion) and BIM is an integral part of the design, delivery and future operation. Our current BIM strategy is to maximise the life-cycle utility that can be achieved from the advances in modelling technology linked to databases of information, so the future operator/maintainer will manage the railway assets effectively and efficiently. 

The organisational needs for data and information in large infrastructure programmes such as Crossrail change and develop throughout the various phases of the project life cycles.  We have developed a common data environment and management system that is used by all designers and contractors to help create two Crossrails - the physical and the virtual – that will ultimately be handed over to the railway operator and maintainer. 

The rapid technology advances that have been made in the past few years continue to play an increasingly important role in how Crossrail creates, manages and exploits the use of data.

  

 

 

Main topics: 

  • The scale and complexity of Crossrail
  • BIM strategy
  • Sources of information
  • What BIM looks like
  • Challenges and lessons learned

 

Learning objectives:  

    • Information lifecycle in practice
    • Importance of rigorous processes and procedures
    • How to exploit changing technologies 

 

 


 

Tomohiko Yamanashi

 

Title: 

BIM Practice in Nikken Sekkei

 

Main content:

 

Nikken Sekkei recognizes that some changes concerned with architectural design have been brought by Information Technology. 

The first change has begun with the technological innovations of design methods such as Computer Simulation.

The second change has been caused by the technological innovations of construction methods such as Digital Fabrication.

The third change has been made by innovative geometry-generating methods such as Computational Design.

Because the digital information plays an important role in all these three changes, we should change the platform to handle these digital data from tracing paper to a more suitable environment too. We believe that BIM is a precise and the only platform to undertake this role now.

This time, I will show you our design process based on this idea through some of our practical works.

  

 

Main topics: 

  • BIM as a platform of the Digital Design Age
  • Computer Simulations and Computational Design in Nikken Sekkei
  • Case Study 1 : Mokuzai Kaikan (The Headqurters of Tokyo Lumber wholesaler)
  • Case Study 2 : Sony City Osaki
  • Case Study 3 : Hoki Museum

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Japanese latest status quo with BIM
  • Practical usage of BIM in japan
  • How to adopt computer simulations in practical works

 


 

 

José Oliveira

 

Title: 

How to include BIM in the future curricula of AEC professionals?

 

Main content:

 

In 2011, the UK government announced that any supplier wanting to bid for public sector construction projects must use BIM tools and techniques by 2016. However, according to a survey conducted by the information service NBS, the perceived expense and time commitments involved in adopting BIM technology remain the biggest barrier to greater up-take.

BIM is the process of generating and managing building data that can be used in the design, costing, construction and maintenance phases throughout the life cycle of the building.

Traditionally, during the early concept and schematic design phases of a project, 2D CAD drawings are issued between consultants and architects for design co-ordination purposes which creates untold checking, cross-checking, and red-lining of drawings, resulting in numerous revisions. With BIM, a single model of the building is produced and can be passed between the consultants, client and project team.

Remember, BIM is here to stay and so we should learn to adapt and embrace it or risk losing ground to others.

  

 

Main topics: 

  • Adoption of BIM 
  • Overall value of BIM
  • The impact of BIM in MEP coordination
  • Internal Business value of BIM
  • Project Value of BIM
  • Player Value of BIM

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Why to use BIM
  • The benefits of using BIM
  • Applying BIM to any project size

 


 

Jonathan Lock

 

Title: 

BIM at Arup – An evolution in engineering design

 

Main content:

 

What does BIM means to Arup? Building Information Modelling (BIM) Is not a single product, service or software solution. It is a descriptive term for the technologically advanced, collaborative and information – centric processes now being used to design the built environment.

It is characterised by use of models that represent databases of geometrical and spatial data along with embedded properties, specifications, performance criteria and other associated computable data.

The models are typically manipulated and interrogated in a 3D environment, but the underlying data can be used to describe the building in many different ways throughout the life-cycle of design, construction, operation and subsequent refurbishment or recycling.

The term “Total Architecture’ implies that all relevant design decisions have been considered together and have been integrated into a whole by a well organised team empowered to fix priorities” – Ove Arup, Founder, Key Speech 1970

   

 

Main topics: 

  • Transition from 3D – London Olympics Aquatic Centre
  • Working in 3D with Contractors – Leadenhall building
  • Working with existing buildings
  • The point cloud
  • Towards Facility Management
  • Delving into the data
  • What about after….?

 

Learning objectives:  

  • What is BIM 
  • Benefits of BIM
  • Understanding the process
  • Understanding the deliverables

 

 

 


 

Francisco Reis

 

Title: 

BIM at Efacec – The new paradigm 

 

Main content:

 

Being one of the greatest Portuguese players in the MEP area, Efacec recognizes that innovation is a key point in the continuous growth that the company has either at a national as well as at an international level.

BIM potentiates the development of more economical solutions and allows us to have a control management of all installation, creating value in all steps of the processes.

The change in the paradigm requires the involvement of people and the creation of new processes.

BIM shall change the present way of working, generating a collaborative model and avoiding the fragmentation of the process of the project, which results in loss of productivity.

The easiness of management of all information as well as the easy visualization of the solutions are the advantages that anticipate the decision making and  allow that the designers and builders to be focused in valued tasks and not in routine processes and verification, which spend resources and are time consuming.   

 

Main topics: 

  • Impact of BIM in the Organization
  • Value of BIM
  • Workflow in Design and support to the Construction
  • Design to Construct in a collaborative way

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Costs reduction in Project using BIM
  • Advantages of using BIM in MEP solutions
  • BIM a way to support and manage the Construction 
  • The value of BIM to the Client

 


 

 Andreas Furenberg 

 

Title: 

BIM-strategy for a construction company, from board decision to end user implementation.

 

Main content:

Peab is a construction and civil engineering company, whose ultimate guiding principle is total quality in all stages of the construction process. In 2009 the board took the decision to put focus on BIM as an important technology for business development in the future. From that day a project started to identify possibilities and a strategy for implementing BIM in Peab. The report that came out from that work made the foundation of what we still are working on and probably will continue working for a couple of years. 

The presentation will include business cases that made our board take the decision to go forward with BIM and what are our BIM processes in Peab today. It will also include our future strategy and the obstacles we have met on the way and that we can predict. I will also share some good practices for a successful implementation that we learn from our experience. 

 

Main topics: 

  • Implementation
  • Business case
  • Simple is still difficult
  • BIM-strategy

 

 


 

Frank Haase 

 

Title: 

Implementation of integrated 5D VDC processes.

 

Main content:

5D integrated processes integrate in a balanced way different types of know how and services.  5D transforms  standalone services of cost estimating, scheduling  and constructability review  into a seamless value rich solution. 

The implementation of 5D integrated processes is a cross functional change.  The installation of this process is carried out by a cross functional team that operates unconfined by departmental requirements dedicated to develop and define the new integrated solutions. In a second step the new process is rolled out transforming the cross functional team into a service team. This service team provides direct services in the form of deliverables such as cost estimates, schedules, constructability reviews and indirect services in the form of training for departments and project teams. 

 

 

Main topics: 

 

  • 5D process overview
  • Implementation strategy
  • Cross functional team selection
  • Corporate sponsorship
  • The role of visionary leadership

 

Learning objectives:  

  • What is cross functional change 
  • What are the benefits of the 5D cross functional change
  • What are the difficulties
  • A possible solution 

 


António Ruivo Meireles 

 

Title: 

An advanced integration of BIM in the construction process.

 

Main content:

Welcome to a truly 5D BIM! This class showcase a BIM based physical and economic planning and control system inspired in advanced management methods. BIM has the potential for truly changing the way people plan and communicate and manage resources.

The forecast of the cash flow of a site depends of a good work scheduling. A good work scheduling depends of the quality of information available, like the quantity takeoff. BIM can be the ultimate database of the site, which supplies all the information that supports the decision and the definition of scenarios.

Advanced construction management methods, like line of balance and earned value management, are powered by BIM. On this presentation will be shown how a BIM can be integrated on a construction company and how it can support the site management as a service. 

 

 

Main topics: 

  • 5D process overview
  • Implementation strategy
  • Benefits of a BIM implementation
  • BIM as a service
  • The future

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Not reinventing the wheel 
  • BIM is not expensive
  • What are the difficulties
  • BIM is collaboration 

 


  

Ju Lee Kang

 

Title: 

3D BIM-FM Portal:  Extending BIM into Lifecycle Management

 

Main content:

A Building Information Model has been proven to deliver immense cost savings and production efficiencies in the construction industry since its recent widespread use around the world. A hidden potential of this technology is yet to be leveraged and that is the “I” in BIM, i.e. how does one harvest the potential of the richness of “Information” that reside within the model to continue realizing economies of scale this same information can provide during the operational phases of a facility?  Knowing that the most costly phase of ownership of a building during its life cycle occurs not during its construction phase but rather during its operational phase, how can a BIM assist owners, technicians, managers and occupants achieve these cost savings, energy efficiencies and level of occupational comfort by fully utilizing technologies that exist within their fingertips and that which are in the realm of possibilities?

 

We will explore how a large institutional owner has begun to utilize BIM to increase efficiencies in their building (micro scale) and campus (macro scale) management of assets and day to day operations. We will also be looking at their development of a new BIM Portal that extends BIM to Lifecycle Management by linking data-rich as-built models to existing O&M and FM software platforms.  Lastly , we will take a quick look into what it takes to embark on this endeavor and ponder on its capabilities. 

 

 

Main topics: 

 

  • Integration of Asset Management (CMMS), Document Management (EDMS) and Energy Management Systems (EMS) with BIM
  • Introduction to the 3D BIM-FM Portal
  • Exploration of 3 Real Life Use Cases in a Facility’s Day-to-Day Operations
  • How, Who, What and When does data get collected into a model ?
  • The role that the implementation of BIM Guidelines and use of industry standards like COBie, OmniClass and the National CAD Standards play in making this happen

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Understand the full capabilities of a Building Information Model and what this means to institutional level owners and their expectations
  • Explore the process and coordination involved during construction in preparing models for lifecycle management
  • Grasp the importance of BIM standards in the execution of projects for future stakeholders

 

 


 

Tomo CEROVSEK  

 

Title: 

How to include BIM in the future curricula of AEC professionals?

 

Main content:

What is the total BIM Lifecycle (From As-Designed to As-Managed BIM)

Understand the potential of building information models (BIM) – which are developed by architects and engineers for the design, analysis, visualizations and documentation during pre-construction, construction and post-construction phases. As construction project evolves the BIM content is changing. The changes in post-costruction that support and result from Facility Management (FM) should be stored in As-Managed BIM that extends As-Built BIM to make use of BIM FM Systems. 

How to make use of BIM for FM (The path to the benefits of BIM for FM)

Implement BIM FM system that enables a complete overview of plots, buildings, stories, spaces and building systems, along with daily operational data. An overview of major steps to a successful implementation of BIM FM systems shall be given, covering: planning, design, implementation and support. The benefits that shall be addressed are: improved information access, transparency and facility condition, lower costs of ownership and environmental impacts.

How to implement standards with BIM FM (Key Performance Indicators)

Make use of BIM FM Systems to deploy European standard for facility management EN 15221 on all three levels: (1) Strategic, (2) Tactical and (3) Operational sustainable FM. Key indicators include operational costs, preventive, corrective and breakdown maintenance, facility condition along with reduced use of materials, impacts on the environment, including sustainability indicators: energy and water consumptions, CO2 footprint and use of chemicals.

What are the state-of-the-art FM features (Integrated BIM FM SaaS)

Envision BIM FM SaaS centralized repository of documentation, advanced model based support for maintenance planning, breakdown reporting, task and work-order management, along with supply chain management and diaries with complete control of information - linked to locations in the BIM. BIM FM integrates BIM and databases, which together, enable integrated planning, maintenance, reporting and reduction of total cost of ownership of buildings. Advanced BIM FM features that must be provided, are: model based space management, tenant management, move management, reporting with technical management and technological maintenance of systems and installations. 

How does BIM FM work in practice (Case studies: Hospital & University)

Get familiar with large scale case-studies: a Hospital project and University Project with over 300 buildings. The presentation will provide an overview of the working systems, details on the developed BIM libraries, integration issues and practical implications. 

 

Main topics: 

  • What is the total BIM Lifecycle (From As-Designed to As-Managed BIM)
  • How to make use of BIM for FM (The path to the benefits of BIM for FM)
  • How to implement standards with BIM FM (Key Performance Indicators)
  • What are the state-of-the-art FM features (Integrated BIM FM SaaS)
  • How does BIM FM work in practice (Case studies: Hospital & University)

 

 


 

Arto Kiviniemi 

 

Title: 

How to include BIM in the future curricula of AEC professionals?

 

Main content:

BIM is a rapidly growing area in the AEC (Architectural, Engineering and Construction) Industry and will cause fundamental changes in the professional roles, work processes and business models. Achieving the full benefits the new technology requires clear understanding of the BIM concepts and information flows in the process. However, most educational institutions still teach their students based on the old document based paradigm. Including BIM is not easy because of the existing curricula are extensive, there is no room for additional topics and in some cases changing the content might risk the accreditation of the courses. The presentation will discuss the challenges and possibilities and use the development at the University of Salford as a potential example.

 

Main topics: 

  • Challenges and possibilities in implementing BIM in education
  • Viewpoints of architectural design and technology
  • What should be different in BIM based education and why?
  • Where are we at the University of Salford?
  • Conclusions

 

Learning objectives:  

  • Effects of BIM in the industry and its impacts to required skills
  • Why would BIM require different education
  • What should the educational institutions consider when implementing BIM in their courses